Browse Prior Art Database

Distribution of Function in a Network

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000081733D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 3 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Albrecht, H: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

A network is considered to be a collection of intelligent processors (programmed computing machines) and a collection of I/O devices (typewriters, type devices, card reader/punches, CRT displays, line printers, etc.). In the network the intelligent processors are connected together, such that information may pass from one processor to at least one other processor. Each I/O device is connected to at least one processor. (Image Omitted)

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Distribution of Function in a Network

A network is considered to be a collection of intelligent processors (programmed computing machines) and a collection of I/O devices (typewriters, type devices, card reader/punches, CRT displays, line printers, etc.). In the network the intelligent processors are connected together, such that information may pass from one processor to at least one other processor. Each I/O device is connected to at least one processor.

(Image Omitted)

The previous method of interpreting a request by some intelligent processor for a function to be performed at some I/O device, is for the processor to break down the requested function into operations that the I/O device can obey and then send data requesting the lowest level operations to the I/O device. In the present method, the initial request is broken down into basic operations in successive steps by several intelligent processors on the path to the I/O device. In the network shown above, a request initiated in A for a function to be performed on I3 may be implemented in any of the following ways. In each case, the intelligent processors share the function of breaking down the original request into the basic function required of I3: A -> D -> F -> I3

A -> C -> F -> I3

A -> C -> E -> F -> I3.

Since the different I/O devices obey different basic orders, the function of breaking down the initial requests will depend upon the ultimate destination. Each request, therefore, carries with it both source and destination identification, both of which are used in each node of the network to select the function to be invoked in that node.

Some processors are capable of providing the same function at more than one node in a path between source and destination, and a method of selecting functions performed in each node is required. Since at the time of connection of a source to a destination, a connection or communication ID can be assigned by concatenating the source and destination ID's to form a unique identifier. This can be used as a function selection criterion by each node, provided it is included in all tra...