Browse Prior Art Database

Binary Mosaic Encryption Scheme

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000081778D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 4 page(s) / 19K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Orceyre, MJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Most encryption schemes employ various manipulations of and operations upon characters, sets of characters, words, and sets of words. This is a scheme for encrypting a picture of a message, not the character or word constituents of the message. The encrypted message image will not yield to known cryptanalysis techniques.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 31% of the total text.

Page 1 of 4

Binary Mosaic Encryption Scheme

Most encryption schemes employ various manipulations of and operations upon characters, sets of characters, words, and sets of words. This is a scheme for encrypting a picture of a message, not the character or word constituents of the message. The encrypted message image will not yield to known cryptanalysis techniques.

Concept - Consider a matrix of "spaces" arranged in, for discussion sake, 300 columns and 20 rows. Each space is either black or white. There are 6000 such spaces in the matrix. In this particular matrix, the message: When in Rome, drink imported water. has been created by making the appropriate spaces black. An "i", for example, is drawn with 8 black spaces (one for the dot), and looks like the "i" typed here. Obviously the "i" could be made bigger with more spaces or smaller with fewer spaces.

Now cut the matrix up completely, and you have 6000 spaces in a pile. The spaces all look exactly alike except for whiteness and blackness. They could be reassembled into a very large number of shapes (not just a 300 by 20 matrix). Indeed, even if a reassembler (cryptanalyst) were told to start by creating a 300 by 20 matrix, he could do it by 6000 different ways. In so doing, he would create an enormous number of perfectly legible meaningful messages in every language known to man, in languages unknown to man, and in languages inconceivable to man, not to mention that he would create a similarly large number of artistic line drawings and other interesting patterns. The reassembler, lacking knowledge of the original matrix address of each space in this relatively small example, has a real problem.

This is a proposal for accomplishing similarly powerful message scrambling through the use of either hardware or software. Although such scrambling is not particularly efficient (in today's computing and transmission environment), it is extremely effective.

Software Method - The message to be encrypted is presented as ordinary input (an EBCDIC character string, for example) to the encryption routine. The encryption routine (1) creates a pictorial representation of the message in main storage, and then (2) scrambles that picture into an entirely different representation. These two steps are outlined below:
(1)There exists a clear-text message, an encryption

routine, a library on peripheral storage of pictorially

represented character sets, one or more pseudorandom

number generators, and a key. The library is a set of

character sets, where each character set contains different

pictorial representations of characters. One character

set, for example, might contain characters represented

as 8-byte strings (logically, each character is "drawn"

within an 8 by 8 bit matrix). The library may contain

any number of such character sets; in each set the

individual characters are "drawn" differently, occupy

a larger or smaller bit matrix, and may differ in their

1

Page 2 of 4

size relative to the bit matrix with...