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Templates for Furniture Layout

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000081793D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hagan, LF: AUTHOR

Abstract

Scaled templates are frequently employed for laying out furniture arrangements on plans of office spaces and other facilities. Conventionally, such templates are constructed to conform to the exact outlines of individual pieces of furniture or other equipment, such as chairs, desks and filing cabinets. Conventional templates require that sufficient scale space be allowed for the use of the furniture and the movement of people. This frequently requires the exercise of judgment by someone having skills in the architectural and design arts.

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Templates for Furniture Layout

Scaled templates are frequently employed for laying out furniture arrangements on plans of office spaces and other facilities. Conventionally, such templates are constructed to conform to the exact outlines of individual pieces of furniture or other equipment, such as chairs, desks and filing cabinets. Conventional templates require that sufficient scale space be allowed for the use of the furniture and the movement of people. This frequently requires the exercise of judgment by someone having skills in the architectural and design arts.

These disadvantages may be overcome by templates which themselves incorporate the necessary additional space, and which may include entire groupings of individual pieces.

Fig. 1 shows a template 10 for a conference arrangement having a table 11, eight chairs 12 and a rectangular credenza or set of shelves 13. The outline 14 of template 10, however, extends beyond these pieces to include the additional space 15 required for the movement of people into and out of the chairs.

Fig. 2 shows a template 20 for an office grouping which includes a desk 21, an armchair 22, a credenza 23 and two side chairs 24. Again the outline 25 of template 20 includes spaces 26, which allow the units and their users to function in the environment of the grouping.

Since templates such as l0 and 20 themselves incorporate the areas required for the use of the individual pieces of furniture or equipment, they may be placed imm...