Browse Prior Art Database

Multimicroprocessor System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000081900D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gates, HR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This data processing arrangement comprises a number of small processors which are interconnected by a loop, or by a plurality of loops. Processors are of two kinds: Control Processors (CP) and Subprocessors (SP). A main memory and some local memories are connected to the processors by storage access buses.

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Multimicroprocessor System

This data processing arrangement comprises a number of small processors which are interconnected by a loop, or by a plurality of loops. Processors are of two kinds: Control Processors (CP) and Subprocessors (SP). A main memory and some local memories are connected to the processors by storage access buses.

For each task to be executed a data block called Master State Vector (MSV) is provided comprising all essential information for executing the task: a Program Status Word (PSW) field, register fields, table fields, etc. Knowledge of the MSV address is enough to take over control of the respective task.

Substate Vectors (SSV) are provided for transferring control of a task between processors or for delegating elementary subtasks to have them executed. They have a minimum size, containing, e.g., only a processor type identification and the address of a MSV.

Control Processors create, maintain, and delete MSVs and PSWs. They also have the purpose of fetching instructions from main memory, analyzing them and preparing them for execution in a Subprocessor by creating SSVs.

Subprocessors accept SSVs from the Command Instruction Loop(s), fetch the necessary data from main memory, execute the subtasks (instructions) and return an updated SSV reflecting the result of the execution to a Control Processor (which need not be the same as the CP that sent out the SSV). Each processor is dedicated to process a specific set of instructions. There may...