Browse Prior Art Database

Water Jet Paper Folder

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000081991D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Caudill, AH: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A simple and accurate structure is proposed for folding copies, letters, and the like-by water jets. This eliminates many moving mechanical parts that are used in conventional machines of this type. Other advantages include: easy operation, higher speeds possible by jet pressure adjustment (no mechanical motion or inertia limitations), and ready adaptation to a copy machine output.

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Water Jet Paper Folder

A simple and accurate structure is proposed for folding copies, letters, and the like-by water jets. This eliminates many moving mechanical parts that are used in conventional machines of this type. Other advantages include: easy operation, higher speeds possible by jet pressure adjustment (no mechanical motion or inertia limitations), and ready adaptation to a copy machine output.

The drawing illustrates a water jet folder. Single sheets are picked from the paper stack 1 by a picker 2, (or directly from a copy machine) to the picker support plate 3. A vacuum transport belt 4 moves the sheet along under water jets 5 and 6, which deposit a very small amount of water along the fold lines 5a, 6a. The jets are in the order of 0.0015" diameter and the wetted line is almost invisible. Each sheet of paper moves along to the folding guides 7, 8 which fold the paper at the desired line. Small spring loaded rollers 9, 10 "set" the paper crease to make it sharp and permanent.

The jets are movable along jet support rod 11 to change the fold line locations. The amount of water deposited is sufficient to reduce the beam strength of the paper but does not cause ink smear on the copy. Distilled water is preferred to prevent problems with plugging at the jets. It may be desirable to add a small amount of wetting agent to the water.

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