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Compact Optical Scanning System using Partially Silvered Mirror

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082000D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Queener, CA: AUTHOR

Abstract

In a compact, desktop copier, the size of the optics/scanning system is of prime importance, since this has a strong effect on the total size of the machine. Not only is the total volume consumed by the optics system important, but also the magnitude of the vertical dimension consumed is important as this has a strong effect on determining the elevation of the document glass. In general, getting this elevation too high tends to be a problem for many configurations.

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Compact Optical Scanning System using Partially Silvered Mirror

In a compact, desktop copier, the size of the optics/scanning system is of prime importance, since this has a strong effect on the total size of the machine. Not only is the total volume consumed by the optics system important, but also the magnitude of the vertical dimension consumed is important as this has a strong effect on determining the elevation of the document glass. In general, getting this elevation too high tends to be a problem for many configurations.

Fig. 1 shows the optics system of the IBM Copier II machine. This includes document glass 1, a primary carriage mirror 2 movable during scanning at velocity V to 2a, secondary carriage mirrors 3 and 4 movable at velocity V/2 to 3a and 4a, respectively, a stationary lens 5, and a stationary mirror 6. Images are directed to photoconductor drum 7 which rotates at peripheral velocity V. Of the systems used in current commercial machines, this has the most innate compactness. The particular embodiment shown in Fig. 1 minimizes the vertical elevation of the document glass in the machine.

Fig. 2 shows a configuration analogous to that in Fig. 1, but offering additional compactness. The elevation of document glass 10 is reduced by compacting the optics system in the vertical dimension.

The optics of Fig. 2 also includes a half-silvered mirror 11 movable during scanning at velocity V to 11a, a full-silvered mirror 12 movable at velocity V/2 to 12a,...