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Friction Cone Drive Clutch for Intersecting Shafts

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082006D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Froula, JD: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A friction cone drive clutch is employed to clutchingly drive two shafts which intersect at approximate right angles to one another. The arrangement self-compensates for wear and provides a controlled slip capability for safety.

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Friction Cone Drive Clutch for Intersecting Shafts

A friction cone drive clutch is employed to clutchingly drive two shafts which intersect at approximate right angles to one another. The arrangement self- compensates for wear and provides a controlled slip capability for safety.

Drive cone 11 made of high-friction material, such as urethane rubber, is fastened to drive shaft 12 supported by bearing 13 in bracket 14. Driven cone 15 made of hard material such as steel providing a high-friction coefficient relative to drive cone 11, is fastened to output shaft 16 supported by bearing 13a and bracket 14. Compression spring 17 is compressed between thrust washer 18 and driven cone 15, to provide normal force between driven cone 15 and drive cone
11. A push-type solenoid 19 is mounted and adjusted so plunger 20 disengages cones 11 and 15 when voltage is applied to stop output shaft motion.

The material of drive cone 11 is soft relative to that of driven cone 15, but is of sufficient hardness (i.e., durometer 70A to 90A) to withstand the load stresses and heat. It is soft to provide uniform wear should the output load stall while the drive shaft 12 continues rotation. Compression spring 17 is designed to provide normal force which allows slip between the cones should the output load exceed the design load. The system is wear compensating as spring 17 extends to keep the cones in contact, should wear occur on the softer drive cone 11 reducing its diameter.

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