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Browse Prior Art Database

Drive Mechanism

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082095D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 62K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Goff, W: AUTHOR

Abstract

A conventional overrunning clutch can perform several different drive functions, by controlling the engagement of teeth on its mounting sleeve with teeth on a separate plate.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 98% of the total text.

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Drive Mechanism

A conventional overrunning clutch can perform several different drive functions, by controlling the engagement of teeth on its mounting sleeve with teeth on a separate plate.

In Fig. 1, a single-drive shaft intermittently drives a clutch press-fitted into a housing which is keyed to a mounting sleeve. A compression spring holds the teeth on the mounting sleeve in engagement with teeth on a stationary plate, permitting free shaft rotation in one direction only while acting as a brake in the reverse direction. When the mounting sleeve is moved to compress the spring, the teeth disengage and the clutch permits the shaft to be freely moved in either direction (for adjustment when not driven).

In Fig. 2, the plate rotates with the driving shaft and a load is connected to the clutch mounting sleeve through a second shaft. Axial movement to separate the teeth of the mounting sleeve disconnects the load from the driving shaft. When the teeth are engaged, the second shaft drives the load in one direction only (ratchet action). The second shaft may be positioned relative to the first shaft (for timing purposes) when the clutch is disengaged.

In Fig. 3, the first shaft is a stationary support and power is applied to the plate through a third shaft. The third shaft drives the second shaft in one direction only, when the teeth engage. The relative positions of the shafts can be changed when the teeth are disengaged.

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