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Ink Drop Deflection Plates

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082107D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Thompson, WU: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Charged ink drops directed toward a recording surface experience charge interaction and aerodynamic drag, which influence their trajectories and distort the printed characters. The effect of these forces is amplified with path length. Improved drop registration is attainable with deflection plates that reduce drop travel. The optimum deflection plate geometry results in the shortest drop travel for a required drop deflection with a given deflection plate voltage.

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Ink Drop Deflection Plates

Charged ink drops directed toward a recording surface experience charge interaction and aerodynamic drag, which influence their trajectories and distort the printed characters. The effect of these forces is amplified with path length. Improved drop registration is attainable with deflection plates that reduce drop travel. The optimum deflection plate geometry results in the shortest drop travel for a required drop deflection with a given deflection plate voltage.

Fig. 1 shows the optimum deflection plate configuration, when the maximum drop deflection plus drop-to-deflection plate clearances exceed minimum plate separation. A minimum practical clearance "C" is always maintained between drops 1 and plates 2 and 3. From points 4 to 5, the plates are parallel and spaced as closely as possible to obtain the maximum potential gradient, but at a distance that prevents spontaneous arcing. From points 5 to 6, plate 3 diverges to maintain a constant clearance with the drop having the greatest deflection. This divergence closely approximates a straight line for some distance after point
5. This configuration results in the product of the deflection force and the duration of this force being maximized.

Plate design should consider aerodynamic drag and the varying potential gradients between diverging plates. Practical limitations such as ink splashing from the recording surface and gutter placement influence plate length. The corners at 4, 5 and 6...