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Integrated Circuit Personalization at the Module Level

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082121D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Drop, JG: AUTHOR

Abstract

The ability to make circuit variations at the module levels as opposed to changing the integrated circuit chip itself, permits the fabrication of a universal integrated circuit chip with more than one circuit variation but which may have multiple uses. The advantage, of course, is that such variation would improve the yield and equipment utilization.

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Integrated Circuit Personalization at the Module Level

The ability to make circuit variations at the module levels as opposed to changing the integrated circuit chip itself, permits the fabrication of a universal integrated circuit chip with more than one circuit variation but which may have multiple uses. The advantage, of course, is that such variation would improve the yield and equipment utilization.

One method of personalizing at the module level is illustrated in the drawing, wherein the integrated circuit chip 11 is mounted on a module or substrate 10 and includes a plurality of lands 12, 13 and 14 which are connected to the contacts of the chip 11. By a bridge, for example a staple or the like 16, desired circuit connections may be made from the land 13 to the land 15. Land 15 is connected, as shown in the drawing, to input output (I/O) pin 25 on the substrate 10 to permit plugging the substrate into, for example, a circuit board.

A second method is to connect by an interstitial pin 17, for example, to make another circuit variation which is connected, in turn, to land 21 (also connected to the chip 11) and by separate metallization beneath the substrate 10 as by land 19 to, for example, I/O pins 23 and/or 24. Thus jumpers or other bridges may be employed at the module level, both above and below the substrate, to form any desired circuit pattern in conjunction with the integrated circuit chip.

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