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Hollow Cathode Discharge Ion Source

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082141D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ko, WC: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This structure provides an improved hollow cathode discharge ion beam source, to be utilized with conventional ion implantation and bombardment equipment. In conventional hollow cathode ion discharge sources, extraction is made through an aperture along the axis of the flow of gas being extracted. It has been found that in such conventional sources, the lifetime of the source is limited to the lifetime of the aperture through which the extraction is being made, because of the high-energy ion bombardment to which the aperture is subjected.

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Hollow Cathode Discharge Ion Source

This structure provides an improved hollow cathode discharge ion beam source, to be utilized with conventional ion implantation and bombardment equipment. In conventional hollow cathode ion discharge sources, extraction is made through an aperture along the axis of the flow of gas being extracted. It has been found that in such conventional sources, the lifetime of the source is limited to the lifetime of the aperture through which the extraction is being made, because of the high-energy ion bombardment to which the aperture is subjected.

The lifetime of the source can be improved by the simple expedient of extracting perpendicular to the ion source, as shown in the figure. The ion density outside of the cathode orifice is about 10/13/ to 10/14//cm/3/, which is comparable to the ion density of conventional duoplasmatron sources. The applied voltage to the cylindrical tube (-VT) is variable but it must fit the relationship VT < VC, where -VT is the negative voltage applied to the cylindrical tube and -VC is the negative voltage applied to the cathode. The ion energy at the cylindrical tube is smaller than that at the cathode. The ion beam can be extracted from the aperture with about a 30kV voltage, negative with respect to the cylindrical tube applied to the extraction electrode.

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