Browse Prior Art Database

Dynamic Character Generation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082145D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 3 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Campbell, TR: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Fig. 1 shows a video digital display system comprising control console 1 serving as the machine/operator interface. Console 1, containing alphanumeric keyboard 2, function keys 3 and control buttons 4, is connected to control unit 5 through adapter 6. Control unit 5 contains control logic circuitry, picture and character storage circuitry, and synchronization and video circuitry and provides local control of the display system. Television monitor 7, normally color, is connected through coaxial cable 8 to control unit 5 which is connected by adapter 9 to a central processing unit, either directly or remotely through a modem, the CPU providing overall control of the display system.

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Dynamic Character Generation

Fig. 1 shows a video digital display system comprising control console 1 serving as the machine/operator interface. Console 1, containing alphanumeric keyboard 2, function keys 3 and control buttons 4, is connected to control unit 5 through adapter 6. Control unit 5 contains control logic circuitry, picture and character storage circuitry, and synchronization and video circuitry and provides local control of the display system. Television monitor 7, normally color, is connected through coaxial cable 8 to control unit 5 which is connected by adapter 9 to a central processing unit, either directly or remotely through a modem, the CPU providing overall control of the display system.

In normal operation, alphanumeric keyboard 2 is used to enter characters on to screen 10 at a character position determined by the position of a cursor on the screen, the position of the cursor, in turn, being controlled by buttons 4. The operator enters a particular character by depressing the appropriate character key 2, which causes a character generator within control unit 5 to generate a pattern of signals to display the character on screen 10. Each character is made up of a matrix of dots, typically 5 x 5 for alphanumeric characters but expanded to 8 x 6 for graphic and special characters.

Normally, the character generator within control unit 5 will contain all the characters normally used in the display system. There will be occasions, however, when it is desirable for a new character to be generated or for an existing character to be modified. Conventionally, this would be done by designing the new character on paper and then either translating the design to a punch-card format, which is loaded into the character generator under program control, or translating the design into data constants and compiling these data constants into a program that will load them into the character generator. Both these methods are rather cumbersome.

A much simpler and easier way is to use th...