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Transfer Medium for Printing Magnetizable Characters

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082153D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Thompson, DA: AUTHOR

Abstract

Fig. 1 and Fig. 2 relate to conventional techniques for magnetizing magnetic ink characters for automatic reading.

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Transfer Medium for Printing Magnetizable Characters

Fig. 1 and Fig. 2 relate to conventional techniques for magnetizing magnetic ink characters for automatic reading.

Fig. 1 shows a magnetic charge pattern induced by DC magnetization, in a stylized capital letter A printed in magnetic ink. Charges are clustered at character borders parallel to a magnetic field, which is parallel to the sides of the paper drawing. This permits "edge readout" only.

Fig. 2 shows magnetic charge patterns induced by AC magnetization in a letter A printed in magnetic ink. Charges are distributed throughout the character in columns recorded at each position where the field attained a maximum or minimum, while the character passed under the recording head gap. This permits "area readout".

In Figs. 3 and 4, a composite typewriter ribbon 1 consists of a tape 2 of cloth, paper or plastic material, a continuous layer 3 of nonmagnetic ink, and bars 4 of magnetic ink. Magnetic ink 4 can contain fine particles of uniformly distributed iron oxide. The horizontal scale in Fig. 3 and the vertical scale in Fig. 4 are magnified for clarity. The actual bars of magnetic ink 4 and the spaces between them are microscopic in the horizontal dimension. The continuous nonmagnetic ink 3 assures optical legibility of the characters.

Fig. 5 depicts a magnetic charge pattern induced by DC magnetization in a letter A printed using ribbon 1 of Figs. 3 and 4.

Fig. 5 resembles Fig. 2, except for invisible parallel...