Browse Prior Art Database

Electrolytic Process for Metal Pattern Generation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082160D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

d'Heurle, FM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The high temperature and high energy, required for the enhancement of adhesion and for the improvement of quality of vacuum deposited films, are incompatible with the existing lift-off or etch-off process that utilizes either a photoresist or metal oxide underlayer for the generation of negative patterns. The high temperature and high-energy deposition of desired metallic layer over the top produces appreciable diffusion and interaction of the metal with the underlayer, destroying the integrity of the negative pattern. Furthermore, the contamination produced by the underlayer material during the deposition and the difficulties encountered in the removal of underlayer that has been thermally cycled, make the application of existing processes impractical.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Electrolytic Process for Metal Pattern Generation

The high temperature and high energy, required for the enhancement of adhesion and for the improvement of quality of vacuum deposited films, are incompatible with the existing lift-off or etch-off process that utilizes either a photoresist or metal oxide underlayer for the generation of negative patterns. The high temperature and high-energy deposition of desired metallic layer over the top produces appreciable diffusion and interaction of the metal with the underlayer, destroying the integrity of the negative pattern. Furthermore, the contamination produced by the underlayer material during the deposition and the difficulties encountered in the removal of underlayer that has been thermally cycled, make the application of existing processes impractical.

Described is a process illustrated by the drawing wherein, by selecting a metal, B, to be used as the underlayer which has no solid solubility with the desired top layer metal, A, it is possible to generate a negative pattern on the metal layer A using a photoresist/etch technique. Then the underlayer B is removed by electrolytic etching after the desired metal A is deposited on the top surface. The process described below in detailed steps 1 through 6 allows clean removal of the underlayer after the deposition of the desired metal layer, for example, at a substrate temperature that can exceed 400 degrees C and under bombardment with energetic particles in a sputtering system.

Step 1. Deposit und...