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Dual Pinion Rotate Selection Mechanism

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082175D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hoskins, JA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A technique for rotating a typehead is illustrated. The typehead 10 is mounted on a typehead rotation shaft 12, which in turn has rotatably attached pinions 14 and 16 thereon. Engaging pinions 14 and 16 are racks 18 and 20, respectively, which are commonly driven by an apparatus for moving them reciprocally right and left in the figure. The driving mechanism is not shown.

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Dual Pinion Rotate Selection Mechanism

A technique for rotating a typehead is illustrated. The typehead 10 is mounted on a typehead rotation shaft 12, which in turn has rotatably attached pinions 14 and 16 thereon. Engaging pinions 14 and 16 are racks 18 and 20, respectively, which are commonly driven by an apparatus for moving them reciprocally right and left in the figure. The driving mechanism is not shown.

The direction of rotation of typehead 10 is controlled by which pinion 14, 16 is engaged with the shaft 12. This is accomplished by a sliding coupling 22 having protrusions 24 extending therefrom. Pinions 14 and 16 have recesses 26 formed therein for the receipt of protrusions 24. As can be seen when coupling 22 is in an up position, the protrusions 24 engage the recesses 26 in pinion 14. Coupling 22 may be slid to a down position thus disengaging pinion 14 and engaging pinion 16, while being fixed rotationally to shaft 12.

As can be readily understood When one pinion is engaged, the other is free to idle or counterrotate freely about shaft 12, thereby being effectively disconnected. The control of slider coupling 22 is effected by the use of a spring bias to force it into its down position, and the use of a magnet formed by pole pieces 28 and core 30. The attraction of a magnetic field positions slider 22 into its up position, thus providing coupling with pinion 14.

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