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Duplication Process Based on Ink Development of Latent Conductivity Pattern

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082207D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Moradzadeh, Y: AUTHOR

Abstract

A copying process which utilizes a latent electrostatically charged oiled surface, which is developed using an oil immiscible ink has been described in the past. The following is a variation of that process.

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Duplication Process Based on Ink Development of Latent Conductivity Pattern

A copying process which utilizes a latent electrostatically charged oiled surface, which is developed using an oil immiscible ink has been described in the past. The following is a variation of that process.

A persistent conductivity photoconductor is heated and cooled in the dark and image wise exposed to light, causing a conductivity pattern in the illuminated regions. The surface is oiled before or after exposure, then inked with a DC biased inking roller. The inked image is then transferred and the oiling, developing and transfer steps are repeated for the desired number of copies.

The nature of image development is reversal. Positive development may be achieved by corona charging the photoconductor after image wise exposure.

Any composition of photoconductors having a persistent conductivity pattern may be used for this purpose; obviously the greater the degree of persistent conductivity, the longer the duration of the image pattern and the greater the number of copies.

The generation of the conductivity pattern need not be electronic, as in the case of persistent conductivity. It could be ionic. A permanent conductivity pattern can also be produced by other methods such as photoetching, and metalizing of a pattern on a surface.

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