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Color Modulated Dye Ink Jet Printer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082227D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chang, IF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A change in the color on application of a current pulse to certain organic dye solutions has been described in the literature. Utilizing such yes as inks in an ink jet printer configuration, it is possible to s selectively bleach desired droplets by appropriately applying a current pulse to individual droplets. Such a concept avoids the usual deflection and guttering arrangements necessary to remove unwanted droplets from a synchronously produced ink jet stream.

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Color Modulated Dye Ink Jet Printer

A change in the color on application of a current pulse to certain organic dye solutions has been described in the literature. Utilizing such yes as inks in an ink jet printer configuration, it is possible to s selectively bleach desired droplets by appropriately applying a current pulse to individual droplets. Such a concept avoids the usual deflection and guttering arrangements necessary to remove unwanted droplets from a synchronously produced ink jet stream.

The present concepts could be achieved, for example, by utilizing, as the bleaching mechanism, two extremely small needle shaped electrodes through which the ink jet stream is passed. Experiment has shown that if the needles are small enough, there will be insignificant effect on the trajectory of the individual ink droplets. By applying suitable pulses to the needles, it is possible to change the color of selected droplets assuming appropriate synchronization is achieved. By utilizing certain silver complexes the passage of current would darken rather than bleach these droplets, wherein the same sort of drop selectivity mentioned above is still possible.

According to a still further concept, certain liquids are known to exhibit a permanent change in color when heated to a given temperature. These liquids are frequently used as temperature indicators in many industrial applications. It would also be possible to use a microencapsulated liquid composed of two components, which are clear when separated but colored when combined. If one or both of these liquids are encapsulated into submicron droplets by a materi...