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Self Aligned Controlling Transducers for Ink Jet Nozzles

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082228D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hutchins, GL: AUTHOR

Abstract

In the manufacture of nozzles for ink jet printing devices, considerable difficulty is experienced in trying to align the transducer structures, i.e., electrodes, at the exit end of the nozzle. This is especially true where there are variations in the nozzle holes, such as the center to-center spacing and variations in the diameter of the holes themselves.

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Self Aligned Controlling Transducers for Ink Jet Nozzles

In the manufacture of nozzles for ink jet printing devices, considerable difficulty is experienced in trying to align the transducer structures, i.e., electrodes, at the exit end of the nozzle. This is especially true where there are variations in the nozzle holes, such as the center to-center spacing and variations in the diameter of the holes themselves.

The method illustrated in Figs. 1, 2 and 3 show a technique for applying resist material 10 to a nozzle body 12, already having a metal layer 14 deposited thereon (see Fig. 1). The resist material 10 is then exposed to light by shining the light from the back side of the nozzle, wherein the resist is exposed by light scattering around the edge of the hole. A subsequent dip etch will then remove the exposed portion, as shown in Fig. 2. The exposed portion which has been removed is shown at 16.

By this technique, variations in hole center-to-center are automatically eliminated and variations in hole size tend to have normalized electrode diameters, which are controlled by the resist exposure and etching conditions. The final configuration, showing the nozzle body 12 and the metal electrode appropriately etched away from the edge of the nozzle, is illustrated in Fig. 3.

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