Browse Prior Art Database

Chip Transfer Tool

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082254D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Smith, FJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

This tool enables the transfer of semiconductor chips from a cleaning fixture to a holding tray, without disturbing the orientation or sequence of the chips. In the manufacture of integrated circuit devices, it is necessary to clean semiconductor chips after the wafer dicing operation. A fixture suitable for cleaning chips is described in IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 16, No. 10, March 1974, page 3159.

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Chip Transfer Tool

This tool enables the transfer of semiconductor chips from a cleaning fixture to a holding tray, without disturbing the orientation or sequence of the chips. In the manufacture of integrated circuit devices, it is necessary to clean semiconductor chips after the wafer dicing operation. A fixture suitable for cleaning chips is described in IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 16, No. 10, March 1974, page 3159.

After cleaning the diced chips it is necessary to transfer the chips to a holding tray prior to testing. In order to maintain orientation and to rotate chips into a pad up position, a special tool is required.

The tool, shown schematically in Fig. 1, comprises a support base 10 upon which the cleaning tool 12 is placed. A rotating vacuum chuck assembly 14, mounted on chuck pivot assembly 16, transfers diced semiconductor chips 24 from cleaning tool 12 to a mechanical vibrator 18 for delivery to a holding tray, not shown. The face of vacuum chucks 14, shown in detail in Fig. 2, contains a plurality of movable wedge members 20 and 22, shown in the unload and pickup positions in Figs. 2A and 2B, respectively.

In the pickup position, the wedges are compressed to allow members 22 to be aligned with semiconductor chips 24. Vacuum from a source, not shown, is applied to wedge members 22 and vacuum chuck assembly 14 is rotated to the unload position. When vibrator 18 is energized, wedge members 22, having one truncated side, force wedge members...