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Three Phase Variable Reluctance Motor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082262D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 82K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chai, HD: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The present three-phase variable-reluctance motor provides very good response and damping characteristics, and offers lower total mass and a higher torque-to-inertia ratio than a four-phase variable reluctance motor. Lower motor power dissipation is also inherent in the design.

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Three Phase Variable Reluctance Motor

The present three-phase variable-reluctance motor provides very good response and damping characteristics, and offers lower total mass and a higher torque-to-inertia ratio than a four-phase variable reluctance motor. Lower motor power dissipation is also inherent in the design.

The motor consists of a six-salient pole laminated stator and proper tooth pitch rotor. Any step increment is possible, the limits depending on either manufacturing techniques or step resolution requirements. To obtain the best dynamic response, bifilar windings are used.

The energization sequence is shown in Figs. 1 and 2. Referring to Fig. 1a, for single-phase energization, with coil A energized the field closes through poles B and C.

Fig. 1b shows coil B energized, which causes a clockwise rotation of the rotor. Again the field closes through A and C. Coil B is oriented to reinforce the field developed from the previous step, and only pole C reverses polarity.

Fig. 1c shows another step in the clockwise direction with coil C energized and the same conditions prevail as in the previous steps.

In Fig. 1d, phase A coil D is energized and the bifilar coil is connected so that opposite polarity is developed from the case shown in Fig. 1a. Coils E and F are energized next in the sequence to sustain the clockwise rotation.

The complete energization sequence for clockwise rotation is A-B-C-D-E-F-A. Counterclockwise rotation requires the reverse order.

Figs....