Browse Prior Art Database

Coevaporation of Methyl and Hydroxy Squarylium

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082355D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Neiman, RR: AUTHOR

Abstract

Previous experience with methyl squarylium, either as an evaporated layer or as a meniscus-coated layer with a binder, had shown that the compound could give the fatigue characteristics needed for an electrophotographic system, but that the material lacked the high sensitivity required for a high-speed system. Hydroxy squarylium, on the other hand, has the required sensitivity but suffers from high fatigue.

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Coevaporation of Methyl and Hydroxy Squarylium

Previous experience with methyl squarylium, either as an evaporated layer or as a meniscus-coated layer with a binder, had shown that the compound could give the fatigue characteristics needed for an electrophotographic system, but that the material lacked the high sensitivity required for a high-speed system. Hydroxy squarylium, on the other hand, has the required sensitivity but suffers from high fatigue.

Mixtures of the two squaryliums, when micronized together to form a slurry which can then be evaporated, apparently have a synergistic effect on the overall electrophotographic properties. That is, an evaporated mixture of the two materials seems to possess not only the stability of the methyl compound, but also the sensitivity of the hydroxy compound.

The best results were obtained with a starting slurry of 60% OH - 40% Me; the exact composition of the evaporated film is unknown but is believed to be more rich in methyl squarylium than the starting slurry would indicate, due to the fact that the Me-Sq is more volatile. In fact, the structure is believed to be graded; that is nearer the substrate the layer is rich in methyl with the amount of methyl dropping off as the layer grows thicker. Such gradation is believed to be important, since electron trapping (predominant in the pure hydroxy compound) is minimized due to the superior electron transport of the methyl compound. Such a configuration would probably have...