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Enhancing Ribbon Transfer using Laser Printing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082381D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

von Gutfeld, RJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Lasers may be used to transfer ribbon ink onto paper, thereby resulting in a form of laser printing. This, however, requires a relatively high amount of laser power.

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Enhancing Ribbon Transfer using Laser Printing

Lasers may be used to transfer ribbon ink onto paper, thereby resulting in a form of laser printing. This, however, requires a relatively high amount of laser power.

The figure shows a laser printing system 2 which requires a relatively low amount of laser power as a result of selectively heating, i.e., thermally biasing, the ribbon in the printing region.

A conducting ribbon 4 is transported between ribbon spindles 6 and 8, which are rotatably mounted on insulated pins 10 and 12, respectively. The ribbon 4 travels over and is in contact with conductive elements 14 and 16, which are connected to a voltage source 18 by way of a line 20 and a variable resistor 22.

Current flows from the source 18, through the wire 20, the element 14, the section of ribbon 4 between elements 14 and 16, the element 16, through resistor 22 and back to the source 18. The temperature to which the ribbon, between the elements 14 and 16, is heated is determined by the setting of resistor 22.

A laser array 24 beams the characters to be printed onto the ribbon 4, thereby depositing the ribbon ink on the print medium 26 for forming the characters thereon.

That the heating of the ribbon 4 results in a lower laser power for printing may be seen by the following equation: P(b) = P(p) (1 - delta T(b)/deltaT(p)) where: P(b) = laser power with thermal bias, P(p) = laser power without thermal bias, delta T(b) = bias temperature above ambient temperatur...