Browse Prior Art Database

Module Power Distribution and Cooling Unit

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082443D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Boehm, RF: AUTHOR [+7]

Abstract

Ideally, power distribution for a module should be handled within the module. In the case of multilayer ceramic (MLC), this is difficult due to the resistivity of the voltage planes. For a multilayer signal board package, the elimination of the board by reducing the number or size of I/Os, as by use of fiber optics, is complicated since the board is required as part of the power distribution system of the module.

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Module Power Distribution and Cooling Unit

Ideally, power distribution for a module should be handled within the module. In the case of multilayer ceramic (MLC), this is difficult due to the resistivity of the voltage planes. For a multilayer signal board package, the elimination of the board by reducing the number or size of I/Os, as by use of fiber optics, is complicated since the board is required as part of the power distribution system of the module.

Due to thermal expansion mismatch, the power distribution portion of the board cannot be directly attached to the ceramic module. While a connector coupling could be used, it would be an undesirable expense and, in addition, leave unresolved how to cool the module on the board side. As shown, the present package design represents a feasible approach which eliminates the signal board and makes use of fiber optics. The thermal mismatch is taken up by pins, which serve to make area connections between the module and copper epoxy power planes. Cooling is provided by flow of either air or liquid around the pins and between the module and power planes. The pins can be made of a shape, material, and surface finish to maximize heat transfer consistent with electrical and thermal mismatch requirements. The pins are brazed onto the module along with an appropriate flange arrangement.

The power plane unit is soldered in place and blind holes can be used if leakage is a problem. The enclosure is completed by soldering or se...