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Personalizing Prepackaged Semiconductor Devices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082453D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chang, WH: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A semiconductor device as shown in Figs. 1A and 1B is to be packaged. The differences from the usual device process are that interconnections between the metal-to-diffusion (Fig. 1A) and metal-to-metal (Fig. 1B) layers have been omitted. The resulting device is bonded, back down, onto a ceramic, such as alumina, substrate. This bond may be a gold die bond or one of equivalent high temperature.

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Personalizing Prepackaged Semiconductor Devices

A semiconductor device as shown in Figs. 1A and 1B is to be packaged. The differences from the usual device process are that interconnections between the metal-to-diffusion (Fig. 1A) and metal-to-metal (Fig. 1B) layers have been omitted. The resulting device is bonded, back down, onto a ceramic, such as alumina, substrate. This bond may be a gold die bond or one of equivalent high temperature.

Predetermined I/O pads on the device and on the substrate are connected via gold or aluminum "flying leads", using pressure or ultrasonic bonding as shown in Fig. 3. The device containing module is placed under a microscope onto a computer controlled X-Y table. A pulsed beam of a laser is then directed at discrete connection sights on the device and, personalized, connections are made, as shown in Fig. 2.

When the laser beam personalization is completed, the structure is placed into an annealing chamber. The device is annealed and then coated with protective passivation. The structure is then capped and identified to form the complete module of Fig. 3.

The assembly illustrated in Fig. 4 shows the modified module of Fig. 3 which includes the input/output pins and solder connections 5.

This module is particularly useful for engineering changes (EC's). The EC change is first implemented into the chip which has been back bonded to substrate 6, which is a reverse I/O image of 7, and whose input/output is prewired with flying leads...