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Telephone Spoken Message Transmitter for the Deaf and Mute

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082487D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 4 page(s) / 99K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ludeman, CP: AUTHOR

Abstract

A system for playing back recorded messages is described, to enable deaf and mute persons to communicate routine or emergency messages via a conventional telephone.

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Telephone Spoken Message Transmitter for the Deaf and Mute

A system for playing back recorded messages is described, to enable deaf and mute persons to communicate routine or emergency messages via a conventional telephone.

Fig. 1 shows the lights and switching arrangement for the playback system. The deaf and mute operator places a conventional telephone hand set 1 on the speaker/microphone cradle 2. Dial tone, voice and other types of signals can be grossly sensed by the visual signal lamps 3, whose intensity are a function of the level and frequency output of the telephone ear piece 1. The specific message which the operator desires to transmit is selected, by rotating the message selection switch 4 and depressing the search push switch 5.

When the selected message is ready to transmit, the message ready lamp 6 is energized. Transmission of the message is achieved by depressing the play push-switch 7. The system will play out the prerecorded message and automatically stop at the end of that message. Higher numbered messages may then be transmitted using the same sequence of operational steps, while lower numbered messages may be transmitted after going through a rewind and search routine.

The system described uses a conventional two-track cassette audio tape recorder/player. The audio tape format is shown in Fig. 2, where track 1 contains the spoken messages and track 2 contains beginning of message (BOM) and end of message (EOM) tone bursts which serve to control the starting and stopping of the system. A series of identical BOM tones are prerecorded on each fresh tape cassette and are spaced so as to allow a reasonable time for each message.

The BOM frequency is approximately 80Hz at play speed and 2000Hz at search speed. The search speed for the recorder/player is approximately 25 times the play speed. The BOM tone burst can be read only at the search speed. A series of identical EOM tones are prerecorded...