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Automated Test With Interface Verification Simulation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082497D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Heuermann, CA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In order to unit test modules which interface with other modules that are not available, it is necessary to either write a simulation module or to manually perform the simulation of the module. Currently no tool is available to simulate modules based solely on the data transformations that the module performs, or to verify the data interfaces to the module. This following description describes the automation of the interface verification and the method of simulating the data transformations of the module not available at test time.

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Automated Test With Interface Verification Simulation

In order to unit test modules which interface with other modules that are not available, it is necessary to either write a simulation module or to manually perform the simulation of the module. Currently no tool is available to simulate modules based solely on the data transformations that the module performs, or to verify the data interfaces to the module. This following description describes the automation of the interface verification and the method of simulating the data transformations of the module not available at test time.

An automated unit test (AUT) system provides interface verification and simulation of unavailable programs. A Module Interface Language - Specific (MIL-S) is an interface language used by AUT to completely describe the data transformations performed by a module. The MIL-S statements are grouped in variations which describe an execution path through a module. AUT used the variations to determine a module's correctness.

Language statements allow a user to define references (from the module being tested) which are to have their interface verified and simulated.

When the module to be simulated is invoked from the module under test, AUT receives control and uses a variation from the MIL-S statements for the reference module to verify the interface and perform the simulation.

The general process is illustrated in the flow chart and its unique aspects are:
1) Automated interface verificati...