Browse Prior Art Database

Automated Translation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082514D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 4 page(s) / 146K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Moran, JW: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

When constants and data fields of a data file have been translated from the English language to another language by manual translation, a new release or version of that same data file will cause an iteration of the manual translation process. During the process of manual translation, the translator makes decisions as to which records and or fields are to be replaced.

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Automated Translation

When constants and data fields of a data file have been translated from the English language to another language by manual translation, a new release or version of that same data file will cause an iteration of the manual translation process. During the process of manual translation, the translator makes decisions as to which records and or fields are to be replaced.

After the translation is finished (all needed replacements have been made), the next release of the same data file is sent to the translator for retranslation. It is at this point that he must decide which records have been changed, added or deleted from his translatable records within the file. In many cases, no changes have been caused at all, other than the resequencing of his translation changes that are to be reapplied to the new version of the data file.

In either case, the translator must manually go through the file for his corrections which is both time-consuming and costly.

When the data file is first built and when new records are added to the file, any records or fields that have the possibility of future translation are flagged. When one physical record is followed by another physical record of translatable data, this second record is known as a continuation record and flagged as such. Each logical record is comprised of one or more physical records (that is, a flagged translatable physical record followed by flagged physical continuation record make up a logical record). From this are formed two distinct parts of a sequencing scheme: a primary number referencing only logical numbers and a physical number referencing only continuation records; e.g.,

From the above-sequencing scheme, any record can now be referenced within a data file to change or delete it for maintenance purposes of the data file. The only problem that remains is the need to add new logical records to the data file, without changing existing primary records within the file. To accomplish this, the primary number is extended to include the new add portion of the sequence number. This now completes the full sequence number to give XXXXX (the primary number), YYY (the add number) and -ZZ (the physical number) to be written as follows XXXXX.YYY-ZZ.

When the first release of the data file is sent to the translator, only records with primary and physical numbers are contained within. The tr...