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Manufacturing Coils and Shields

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082534D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bargon, J: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Radio-frequency coils, Faraday shields or the like are fabricated by applying a conductive ink pattern on a nonconductive surface, then baking to convert the ink into a dry conductive pattern, and then, where desired electroplating the conductive pattern.

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Manufacturing Coils and Shields

Radio-frequency coils, Faraday shields or the like are fabricated by applying a conductive ink pattern on a nonconductive surface, then baking to convert the ink into a dry conductive pattern, and then, where desired electroplating the conductive pattern.

For example, to fabricate a radio-frequency coil, the conductive ink is applied on a quartz rod or tube in a helical pattern in a lathe, then baked at 500 degrees C for several minutes in a furnace. Since the ink provides a very thin film of conductive material, the conductive pattern is preferably electroplated with a suitable metal, such as silver, to reduce resistance and increase the Q-value of the coil.

Coils thus produced have a high Q-value, provide a very homogeneous RF field, require little volume, have high-temperature resistance, admit ultraviolet light, and are particularly suited as receiver and transmitted coils for nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers.

Leads for the coil and comb-like patterns used as Faraday shields between crossed coils can be fabricated using a similar technique.

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