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Depositing a Sputtered SiO(2) Film having Maximum Planarization

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082608D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lechaton, JS: AUTHOR

Abstract

In the formation of integrated circuits, it is a conventional expedient to form an insulative layer 10 on a semiconductor substrate 20 and open holes in insulative layer 10. Then platinum silicide films 11 and 11' are formed in these holes. Next, metallic contact 12 may selectively be made to the platinum silicide areas. In Fig. 1, an aluminum contact 12 is made to platinum silicide 11 but not to 11'. Such a selective structure may give rise to a problem when silicon dioxide is to be deposited over the entire structure by RF sputtering techniques at a higher resputtering rate, which exceeds standard upper limits of the power level applied to the substrate.

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Depositing a Sputtered SiO(2) Film having Maximum Planarization

In the formation of integrated circuits, it is a conventional expedient to form an insulative layer 10 on a semiconductor substrate 20 and open holes in insulative layer 10. Then platinum silicide films 11 and 11' are formed in these holes. Next, metallic contact 12 may selectively be made to the platinum silicide areas. In Fig. 1, an aluminum contact 12 is made to platinum silicide 11 but not to 11'. Such a selective structure may give rise to a problem when silicon dioxide is to be deposited over the entire structure by RF sputtering techniques at a higher resputtering rate, which exceeds standard upper limits of the power level applied to the substrate.

It has been found that when silicon dioxide is sputter deposited in this manner, the result is a structure shown in Fig. 1 where silicon dioxide layer 13 fails to deposit, or is only sparsely and discontinuously deposited, on the platinum silicide film 11' which has not been covered by a metal contact. This phenomenon is believed to be due to a higher reemission of sputtered material adjacent to the exposed platinum silicide contact 11', as compared to the remainder of the surface. As background, with respect to the phenomenon of resputtering and sputtered deposition, attention is directed to U.S. Patent 3,804,738.

Of course, the undesirable exposure of unused platinum silicide contact 11' will lead to problems when a second layer of metallization...