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Discontinuous Ferromagnetic Media for Bubble Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082881D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Suits, JC: AUTHOR

Abstract

A film of ferromagnetic material suitable for bubble domain applications having a discontinuous geometry is described. The film could be, (a) a layered structure consisting of a layer of ferromagnetic material and a layer of nonmagnetic material, as shown in Fig. 1, or (b) a supersaturated solid solution containing both ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic material, as shown in Fig. 2. The structures shown in Figs. 1 and 2 provide a low-magnetization value, M, and a high Curie temperature, T(c), properties which are important for bubble domain materials.

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Discontinuous Ferromagnetic Media for Bubble Applications

A film of ferromagnetic material suitable for bubble domain applications having a discontinuous geometry is described. The film could be, (a) a layered structure consisting of a layer of ferromagnetic material and a layer of nonmagnetic material, as shown in Fig. 1, or (b) a supersaturated solid solution containing both ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic material, as shown in Fig. 2. The structures shown in Figs. 1 and 2 provide a low-magnetization value, M, and a high Curie temperature, T(c), properties which are important for bubble domain materials.

In Fig. 2, the overall magnetization of the structure will be reduced in the ratio of the thickness of the ferromagnetic layers to the total thickness. The ferromagnetic layers have a thickness such that they have bulk properties as well as a high Curie temperature. An example of the structure shown in Fig. 1 is where the ferromagnetic material is permalloy, iron or silicon iron and the nonmagnetic material is silver or gold.

The structure shown in Fig. 2 consists of a mixture of nonmagnetic and ferromagnetic particles. This structure may be formed by the precipitation of a ferromagnetic phase from a supersaturated solid solution. Preferably, the distance between the ferromagnetic particles and the non-magnetic particles must be small, compared to the size of the bubble domain walls.

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