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Fabrication of Homogenous Small Grain Sputtering Targets

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082883D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Street, GB: AUTHOR

Abstract

This description relates to a process for forming a sputtering target of a reactive material, such as gadolinium cobalt. The resultant target has improved homogeneity, physical continuity, small grain structure and reduced phase separation. The process is as follows: (1) The GdCo is heated to its melting point, for example, around 1400 degrees C (depending upon the composition) in a boron nitride crucible. (2) The GdCo is poured slowly and dropwise into a Mo mold having the shape of the sputtering target (for example, a disk 3" by 1/4" thick). The drops of GdCo are continued until the mold is filled, at which time the addition is stopped.

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Fabrication of Homogenous Small Grain Sputtering Targets

This description relates to a process for forming a sputtering target of a reactive material, such as gadolinium cobalt. The resultant target has improved homogeneity, physical continuity, small grain structure and reduced phase separation. The process is as follows: (1) The GdCo is heated to its melting point, for example, around 1400 degrees C (depending upon the composition) in a boron nitride crucible. (2) The GdCo is poured slowly and dropwise into a Mo mold having the shape of the sputtering target (for example, a disk 3" by 1/4" thick). The drops of GdCo are continued until the mold is filled, at which time the addition is stopped.

The mold is maintained at a very low temperature, the lower the better. For example, room temperature is satisfactory; O degrees C is better and the temperature of liquid nitrogen that is -190 degrees C is best. The key to obtaining the best results with this process is to maintain the Mo at a very low temperature, so that the Mo in the target mold will not react with the GdCo.

The molten GdCo is added to the mold slowly and dropped in a drop-wise manner, so that each drop will cool and solidify immediately as soon as it touches the mold. This is done by adding a drop of the molten material to the mold in a manner, such that the next drop will cover a portion of the mold which has not had any molten material dropped on it.

When the bottom surface of the mold is completely...