Browse Prior Art Database

Trip Ticket

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082886D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 3 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hurley, MG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Described is an airline ticketing, passenger handling, and baggage handling system. Preencoded trip tickets serve as a machine readable transaction key to initiate, identify, and record the normal actions of an airline passenger. The trip ticket key permits online knowledge of the passenger's latest action, and permits control of his access to boarding areas and/or planes without human verification.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Page 1 of 3

Trip Ticket

Described is an airline ticketing, passenger handling, and baggage handling system. Preencoded trip tickets serve as a machine readable transaction key to initiate, identify, and record the normal actions of an airline passenger. The trip ticket key permits online knowledge of the passenger's latest action, and permits control of his access to boarding areas and/or planes without human verification.

Ticketing coder 14 records on the magnetic stripe of each of the plurality of tickets 16 a unique ticket identification number or key. These preencoded tickets 16 are then distributed to supplies 26,28, associated with agent terminal 24 and credit sale terminal 30, respectively, and to a ticket hopper, not shown, within automatic ticket vendor 32.

Tickets 16 may also be printed by ticket encoder 14 so that the key number associated with each ticket is visually decipherable. Thereafter, it is not necessary to provide for encoding on the ticket 16, and magnetic ticket readers only need be provided in boarding terminal 34, check-in terminal 36, baggage terminal 38, automatic ticket vender 32, and, possibly, agent terminals 24 and credit sales terminal 30. Of course, a keyboard could be provided at agent terminal 24 and credit sales terminal 30, at which an agent or sales clerk could enter the ticket key number visually read from the ticket. Also, automatic ticket vender 32 could possibly be provided with a ticket encoder and, in communication with central reserve reservation systems CPU 10, could encode a ticket with its key number at the time it is vended.

As in existing systems, a plurality of agent terminals 24 are provided in communication with the central reservation system's CPU 10 through concentrators 18. A supply of tickets 26 is provided to the agent and may be distributed by him to individuals appearing at his station for the purpose of purchasing reservations, or mailed to those who make reservations over the phone.

In making the reservation, the agent would key in at his keyboard the appropriate flight designations and the ticket key number. That ticket key number read from the ticket or keyed in by the agent would access a location in file A, at which location the reservation and, possibly billing, information would be filed. In addition to providing the passenger with his ticket 26, the agent would also provide an itinerary card or receipt to the customer.

Automatic ticket vender 32 comprises a ticket issuer, and a keyboard at which the customer can identify the trip itinerary. A supply of preencoded tickets 16 or a blank tickets, not shown, which could be encoded in a ticket encoder included within ticket vender 32, is provided for issuance to the customer. In a similar manner to that for the agent terminals 24 and credit sales t...