Browse Prior Art Database

Surface Energy Tester

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082887D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Tietze, AR: AUTHOR

Abstract

The surface conditions of items can be measured by viewing the effect on a raster pattern when projected and reflected from the surface area of the item in contact with a liquid. A raster having the pattern shown in Fig. 2 is sensed by the TV camera, after projection through the liquid and reflection from the surface of the item to be tested. The meniscus between the surface and the liquid in the bath distorts the raster pattern, which is then displayed on a monitor connected to the TV camera such as that shown in Fig. 3.

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Surface Energy Tester

The surface conditions of items can be measured by viewing the effect on a raster pattern when projected and reflected from the surface area of the item in contact with a liquid. A raster having the pattern shown in Fig. 2 is sensed by the TV camera, after projection through the liquid and reflection from the surface of the item to be tested. The meniscus between the surface and the liquid in the bath distorts the raster pattern, which is then displayed on a monitor connected to the TV camera such as that shown in Fig. 3.

The apparatus for checking the surface energy of items, as shown in Fig. 1, includes a light source 10 whose light is diffused by a light diffusing medium 12 and directed into the clear liquid 14, such as deionized water, through the raster
16. The item 18 to be checked is mounted for rotation on a motor 20 while inserted in the liquid. A mirror 22 directs the light reflecting from the surface of the item 18 into the TV camera 24. The camera 24 picks up the raster pattern as distorted by the meniscus for display on the monitor 26.

The rotation of the item 18 enables the testing of the entire surface. The surface tension and changes are detected by the change in line spacing of the vertical lines 28 of the raster 16, Fig. 3. The diagonal lines 30 detect the shape of the meniscus and its contact angle. An angle of 20-30 Degrees between the view path and the surface of the item 18 is used to permit checking of different items,...