Browse Prior Art Database

Spherical Joint For a Mechanical Assembler

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000082917D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Zloof, MM: AUTHOR

Abstract

A spherical joint shown in Figs. 1 and 2 extends from the end of the arm of a mechanical assembler to provide yaw and pitch motions. Arm A attaches to inner ring C, allowing outer ring B to slide around it to provide pitch motions. Ring D attaches to ring B perpendicular to the plane of rings B and C. Ring E slides to provide yaw motions. Assembler gripper fingers F are mounted on ring E. Ring B slides around ring C until rings D and E touch arm A of Fig. 1, to provide a pitch angle of about 300 Degrees. Ring E slides around ring D until fingers F touch ring B and ring C to provide a yaw angle of about 300 Degrees.

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Spherical Joint For a Mechanical Assembler

A spherical joint shown in Figs. 1 and 2 extends from the end of the arm of a mechanical assembler to provide yaw and pitch motions. Arm A attaches to inner ring C, allowing outer ring B to slide around it to provide pitch motions. Ring D attaches to ring B perpendicular to the plane of rings B and C. Ring E slides to provide yaw motions. Assembler gripper fingers F are mounted on ring
E. Ring B slides around ring C until rings D and E touch arm A of Fig. 1, to provide a pitch angle of about 300 Degrees. Ring E slides around ring D until fingers F touch ring B and ring C to provide a yaw angle of about 300 Degrees.

The pitch motor, not shown, is conventional and mounts on arm A driving ring B with a gear. The yaw motor, not shown, is a shell or disk printed-circuit motor and mounts in the inner space of ring D driving ring E with a gear. Advantages over conventional gimbals are much larger pitch and yaw angles to provide flexibility and maneuverability. It is compact, almost symmetric and has no weights such as the conventional gimbal cage (frame). In an alternative, not shown, ring D can be attached to ring B through a groove in the middle of ring C for better stability.

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