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Removal of Ink Mist in an Ink Jet Printer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083032D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bruce, CA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In an electrostatic ink jet printer, some fraction of the drops are charged and these charged droplets of ink are deflected by high-voltage deflection plates. Due to the high velocity of the impacting ink drops used in the printing, some fraction of the charged or uncharged drops returns to the surrounding air as an ink "mist" or "fog." This mist readily causes contamination of the deflection plates, which can lead to a breakdown of the plate field and a concomitant loss of printing ability.

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Removal of Ink Mist in an Ink Jet Printer

In an electrostatic ink jet printer, some fraction of the drops are charged and these charged droplets of ink are deflected by high-voltage deflection plates. Due to the high velocity of the impacting ink drops used in the printing, some fraction of the charged or uncharged drops returns to the surrounding air as an ink "mist" or "fog." This mist readily causes contamination of the deflection plates, which can lead to a breakdown of the plate field and a concomitant loss of printing ability.

Since it is so difficult to prevent the mist from collecting on the deflection plates, the best approach is to allow the deflection plates to attract the mist and become contaminated, and to provide ways of cleaning or removing the mist from the deflection plates.

In one method (Fig. 1), the deflection plates 10 are periodically cleaned by an adsorbent wiper 11 which periodically contacts the surface of the plates 10. For this method, it is necessary to discontinue the ink flow and to turn off the voltage applied to the deflection plates. The adsorbent wiper 11 is then mechanically moved by actuator 12 into contact with the plates 10, cleans the plate surface, and is removed. The adsorbent wipers 11 can be replaced at suitable intervals.

In a second method (Fig. 2), the deflection plates 13 are made from a thin, flexible, conductive material and are continuously rotated by an insulated mechanical driver 14. This continuous rotation of...