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Field Effect Transistor Magnetic Bubble Domain System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083059D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Laibowitz, RB: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The source-drain current in a field-effect transistor, is very sensitive to changes in the electric field applied between a gate electrode and the channel region carrying the current. The detector part of the described system utilizes this effect to detect magnetic bubble domains with high sensitivity and gain. The large source-drain currents can be further utilized for logic and switching functions initiated by the bubbles.

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Field Effect Transistor Magnetic Bubble Domain System

The source-drain current in a field-effect transistor, is very sensitive to changes in the electric field applied between a gate electrode and the channel region carrying the current. The detector part of the described system utilizes this effect to detect magnetic bubble domains with high sensitivity and gain. The large source-drain currents can be further utilized for logic and switching functions initiated by the bubbles.

The structure consists of a field-effect transistor with a Si gate electrode over which the bubble material is deposited, as shown in Fig. 1. Although bubble propagating structures are not shown, they can be placed on either side of the bubble-domain material and may even be part of the field-effect transistor circuitry. Although two drains are shown in Fig. 1, the system will work with one drain, i.e., a single channel which can be turned on or off, or with three or more drains which can be sequentially operated.

The concept hereof is the detection of the bubbles and the initiation of other switching functions, by use of the Hall effect in the Si gate electrode. With a current through the gate electrode as shown in Fig. 1, and an applied magnetic field, electrons and holes in the Si gate will be driven toward the edges of the Si gate as shown in Fig. 2. This charge imbalance and the resulting electric field changes will be above the channel regions for drain 1 and drain 2, one of which, f...