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Browse Prior Art Database

Josephson Multivibrator and Monostable Circuits

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083063D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Herrell, DJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Employing a parallel L/R circuit in a Josephson flip-flop circuit such as shown in Fig. 1, allows the design of simple multivibrator and monostable circuits.

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Josephson Multivibrator and Monostable Circuits

Employing a parallel L/R circuit in a Josephson flip-flop circuit such as shown in Fig. 1, allows the design of simple multivibrator and monostable circuits.

The circuit of Fig. 1 can be operated as a monostable circuit, by designing the two Josephson devices J1 and J2 to each have different maximum Josephson current, I(m)(0). Consider; I(m)(0)j1 > Iff > Im(0)(j2) (1)

Assume that the supply current, I(ff), flows initially through the branch containing J1 and that; I(ff) < I(m)(0)(j1) (2)

An input, I(c),applied to a control line switches J1 to the V does not = 0 state, as shown in Fig. 2, thereby initiating the transfer of the supply current, I(ff), to the branch containing J2. The circuit, to operate in a monostable mode, should be designed to ensure that the current being transferred into J2 will eventually switch J2 to the V does not = 0 state, but this has to occur after J1 has returned to the V = 0 state. This critical timing can be ensured by using the L/R circuit as a temporary storage.

As J1 switches to V does not = 0, some current is transferred into the L/R branch and some is transferred into the J2 branch. Thus, at a particular time, t(1), after the initiation of the switching, i(1) is in the L/R branch and i(2) in J2, and the total voltage, V(j1), developed across J1 is sufficiently low such that it can now reset.

Since both J1 and J2 are now in the superstate the current still residing in the L/R circuit...