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Incorporation of Dopant Species in Molecular Beam Epitaxial Materials by Low Energy Ion Implantation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083075D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Esaki, L: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A system is proposed for improving the incorporation of dopant species into materials that are being grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE).

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Incorporation of Dopant Species in Molecular Beam Epitaxial Materials by Low Energy Ion Implantation

A system is proposed for improving the incorporation of dopant species into materials that are being grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE).

When growing a material by molecular beam epitaxy, part of the growth process requires the incorporation of dopants into the material simultaneously with the growth of that material. When such simultaneous events are attempted, certain atomic species, used as dopants, bounce off the surface of the growing material and do not stick to it. Thus, when zinc, which is a desirable dopant, is used as a dopant during the molecular beam epitaxial growth of GaAs or Al(x)Ga(1-x)As, the zinc atoms do not stick to the GaAs or the Al(x)Ga(1-x)As. As a consequence,a less desirable dopant, i.e., manganese, is used.

In order to increase the sticking power of zinc to

Al(x)Ga(1-x)As, GaAs and the like, an ion gun is placed in the same chamber in which MBE growth is taking place. As seen in the figure, a GaAs substrate 2 is suitably located within an evacuated chamber 4. An ion gun 6, having appropriate accelerating electrodes 8, emits a dopant (such as zinc) toward the substrate while effusion sources 10 and 12 are directing As and Ga, or other materials, onto the substrate.

The gun operates at energies between a fraction to a few kilovolts so that penetration of the zinc ions occurs to a depth of about 100 Angstroms, depending upon the material...