Browse Prior Art Database

Cleaner for Flexible Magnetic Media

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083112D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 3 page(s) / 26K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bullock, JG: AUTHOR [+8]

Abstract

To a greater or lesser degree, all magnetic media consisting of magnetic particles in a polymer binder and coated on a flexible substrate are subject to wear. Wear may be due to constant or catastrophic contact with a transducing head, due to spontaneous generation of debris along slit edges, or due to other causes.

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Cleaner for Flexible Magnetic Media

To a greater or lesser degree, all magnetic media consisting of magnetic particles in a polymer binder and coated on a flexible substrate are subject to wear. Wear may be due to constant or catastrophic contact with a transducing head, due to spontaneous generation of debris along slit edges, or due to other causes.

Whatever the cause of media wear, in some cases wear generated debris tends to be moved by the media passed the transducer during normal media transducer interaction. The debris may then transfer to the transducer where, under unfavorable conditions, the debris may interact mechanically with the media. causing severe permanent mechanical damage to the media.

Debris can be removed from the media, before it can transfer to a transducer, by utilization of an appropriate cleaning system. Cleaning systems which preferentially remove debris from the media can be produced from a support coated with either 87% WC-13% Co or with TiB(2) deposited, for example, by flame spray techniques. Where WC-Co flame sprayed material is utilized a roughness of about 300 microinches, peak-to-valley, is useful in providing a surface which is not easily clogged with media debris. Where TiB(2) is utilized, buffing of the flame sprayed material is also desirable to remove sharp corners which could damage the media.

Where WC-Co is utilized, the relatively soft cobalt matrix tends to wear preferentially leaving the tungsten carbide particles above the matrix, so that the coating retains its topography. Due to its hardness, TiB(2) does not tend to be worn by the media and this retains its porous surface.

One suitable system incorporating such flame sprayed surfaces is shown. It consists of, for example, a nonmagnetic metal block 10 includ...