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Document Security Feature

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083163D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Martone, JF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

It is well known in the art that it is possible to produce an image by a chemical reaction. A common application of this art is noncarbon reproducing paper. The image is produced by bringing together two sheets of coated paper. One sheet contains the encapsulated donor material, while the second sheet contains a noncapsule receptor material.

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Document Security Feature

It is well known in the art that it is possible to produce an image by a chemical reaction. A common application of this art is noncarbon reproducing paper. The image is produced by bringing together two sheets of coated paper. One sheet contains the encapsulated donor material, while the second sheet contains a noncapsule receptor material.

When a stylus or a type face brings pressure to bear on the capsules, they are ruptured and their contents are free to react with the receptor sheet. The resultant chemical reaction produces an image. Such a technique is generally referred to as a pressure-sensitive recording system.

Shown is a document, such as a credit card, which has a signature panel that is coated with receptor materials containing primary reactants, such as propylgallate, nickel salts, and phenolic resins.

The image of a signature on this signature panel can be created by covering the panel with a sheet of material which includes an encapsulated donor, such as a type manufactured by the 3M Company or the National Cash Register Corporation.

Once an image is created, it is virtually impossible to destroy without destroying the panel. Attempts to alter the image will change the opacity and structure of the signature panel. The image would be resistant to common ink eradicators and normally available acids.

The information on the signature panel could be placed there by utilizing a computer output printer or typewriter using the ma...