Browse Prior Art Database

Purification of Industrial Waste Waters

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083179D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

McGarigle, DM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Organic natural materials have been found effective in removing heavy metal ions. Of these, ordinary garden peat moss has demonstrated particular effectiveness in the adsorption of the various metals. Other materials in either anionic or cationic forms that may be used as protective colloids or agglomerants are albumen, gelatin, zein, casein, sodium caseinate, gums, starches, dextrins and cellulose in various forms such as hydrocellulose, oxidized cellulose or regenerated cellulose.

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Purification of Industrial Waste Waters

Organic natural materials have been found effective in removing heavy metal ions. Of these, ordinary garden peat moss has demonstrated particular effectiveness in the adsorption of the various metals. Other materials in either anionic or cationic forms that may be used as protective colloids or agglomerants are albumen, gelatin, zein, casein, sodium caseinate, gums, starches, dextrins and cellulose in various forms such as hydrocellulose, oxidized cellulose or regenerated cellulose.

It is believed that these materials are able to attract the "fines" of Brownian movement size. The natural polymers apparently have intrinsic capacity to chemically bind heavy metal cations, facilitating their agglomeration in a heavier, more manageable precipitate.

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