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Resource Environment Definition and Scheduling

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083243D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-01
Document File: 4 page(s) / 19K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Darga, K: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

The facilities of Resource Environment Definition and Scheduling are the means by which Administrators indicate their objectives concerning use of the system, by influencing users' access to system resources.

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Resource Environment Definition and Scheduling

The facilities of Resource Environment Definition and Scheduling are the means by which Administrators indicate their objectives concerning use of the system, by influencing users' access to system resources.

The statement of Administrator objectives takes the form of establishment of resource environments in which work can be done. A resource environment is a collection of system resources; both machine and software resources. It may include amounts of ("consumable") machine resources (processing rate storage), and may also include software data objects and other unique resources such as I/O devices.

Typically, a resource environment represents a proper subset of the total system resource capability, either by amount (e.g., less than 100%) or by time (scheduled to exist only part of the time). The purpose of a resource environment is to provide a proper "place" in which to perform some certain kind of work activity (e.g., application development, process control, bank teller applications, etc). A variety of resource environment will be defined by administrators in the system, each designed to properly support some work. There are several advantages in having resource environments: a. Administrator control of the system is enhanced, since Administrators are responsible for the definition of resource environments and the scheduling of those environments. b. Performance repeatability of the work in a resource environment is enhanced, because of increased isolation from other activities in the system. c. Tuning is enhanced, because the isolation of each resource environment makes it a simpler problem to understand and deal with.

Access to these environments is controlled by Administrators, typically on the basis of identification of users and the work they perform. Implicit is the requirement that an Administrator responsible for specifying users' resource environment descriptions must understand those users' resource requirements. Further, it is assumed that where judgements must be made concerning preference of one set of users over others, an administrator can properly assess the value of the users' work to the company.

The resource environment represents a form of constraint on the resource consumption capabilities of its users. It is essentially a limit on the rate of consumption. This is because users' access to the resources is scheduled and spread over time (e.g., one hour per day). On the other hand, absolute upper limits on consumption may be expressed in terms of budgetary limits on users' accounting authorizations (e.g., maximum $100 processing rate). Thus, the resource distribution facilities are used for "rate" of consumption constraints, while a set of accounting facilities would be used for total consumption limits.

All work submitted to the system is identified to some defined user and through this means, the system recognizes and supports Administrators' objectives conc...