Browse Prior Art Database

Structured Bill of Material Explode

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083244D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-01
Document File: 3 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dono, NR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Parts Planning, Ordering, Records, Inventory and Logistic Systems require programs to expand or explode bills of material into total content. Historically, this process destroyed the structured nature of a bill and provided either total part requirements only or total part requirements by the highest level assembly (e.g., machine). Requirements for subassemblies would necessitate separate explosions.

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Structured Bill of Material Explode

Parts Planning, Ordering, Records, Inventory and Logistic Systems require programs to expand or explode bills of material into total content. Historically, this process destroyed the structured nature of a bill and provided either total part requirements only or total part requirements by the highest level assembly (e.g., machine). Requirements for subassemblies would necessitate separate explosions.

Fig. 1 is a flow diagram of a conventional way of generating requirements. The Output Detail Record lists the top bill, detail part number and requirements. The Output Assembly Record lists the top bill, assembly part number and requirements.

Described hereafter is a simple way of maintaining the original structuring of the bill during the explosion process. Preservation of this structure enables subassembly requirements to be identified without reexploding. Parts where- used can also be created to any level of assembly rather than just the highest level. Previous capabilities provided structure with no total requirements, or total requirements with no structure or total and partial requirements to the next highest bill.

Through the addition of four pointers (one record ID, one upward pointer and two downward pointers) to explosion files or data sets, information is maintained to indicate the exploding part number (next-higher or parent), and for subassemblies, information is maintained to indicate the exploded part numbers (next-lower or offspring).

As the explosion proceeds, each output record is assigned an index (counter) number in its record ID pointer. The record ID of the exploding record is assigned to the upward pointer. Downward traceability is provided by recording the ID of the first output record of the exploded subbill into the second downward pointer, thus providing a range of record ID's of the immediate offspring. These latter assignments take advantage of the typical bill of material explode sequence.

Where-used reports can then be provided by tracing backwards through the upward pointers to provide the proper genealogy and requirements for any given part. Subassembly requirements are obtained without reexplosion, by following th...