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Multiple IMS Transaction Approach for IMS Conversations

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083254D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-01
Document File: 4 page(s) / 88K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Beard, RG: AUTHOR [+7]

Abstract

A method is provided to allow a continuous Information Management System (IMS) conversation while interacting with multiple IMS transactions. This provides a work station environment for an untrained user, rather than a transaction by transaction environment where the transactions must be known as defined to IMS. Rules by user type provide the necessary control and security for the transactions. This eliminates the need for passwords.

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Multiple IMS Transaction Approach for IMS Conversations

A method is provided to allow a continuous Information Management System (IMS) conversation while interacting with multiple IMS transactions. This provides a work station environment for an untrained user, rather than a transaction by transaction environment where the transactions must be known as defined to IMS. Rules by user type provide the necessary control and security for the transactions. This eliminates the need for passwords.

A conversation, as defined by IMS, allows a user to interact with application program(s) in a message processing region and to retain information in a Scratch Pad Area (SPA) between the interactions. Fig. 1 shows that the user must enter the transaction code, password, and data to start the transaction. The user interacts with the transaction until his processing is complete. This terminates the transaction and the conversation.

To process another transaction, the user has to enter that transaction code, password, and data. Therefore, the user needs to know all the transaction codes, passwords and data required for support of the transaction. Thus, as shown in Fig. 1, a terminal conversation consists of a single IMS transaction and has a short duration.

The present method, as illustrated in Fig. 2, expands the concept of conversational processing as supported by IMS. At terminating of a transaction, another transaction is invoked by using the change function and by modifying the SPA. Determining the next transaction is accomplished through option menus and other related displays.

Option menus are dynamically built by user type which allows a choice of available options. Since only those options a user can perform are displayed, there is no need for transaction password protection. The application program through rules establishes which transaction is invoked when the user makes his selection. Therefore, the user does not need to know transaction codes.

Fig. 2 depicts where many transactions are used in a conversation. The user requests a sign-on screen...