Browse Prior Art Database

Frictionless Surface for Ferrofluid Propagation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083297D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Romankiw, LT: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The use of ferrofluids in display media involving the use of plural immiscible fluids, one of which (the ferrofluid) contains a colloidal suspension of magnetite or the like permeable material, requires the ability to move a magnetic (ferrofluid) liquid through another host fluid with as little force, and thus as little energy consumption, as possible.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 67% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Frictionless Surface for Ferrofluid Propagation

The use of ferrofluids in display media involving the use of plural immiscible fluids, one of which (the ferrofluid) contains a colloidal suspension of magnetite or the like permeable material, requires the ability to move a magnetic (ferrofluid) liquid through another host fluid with as little force, and thus as little energy consumption, as possible.

To enable generated forces to predominate, existing, interfering natural forces are neutralized. Gravity is counterbalanced by, in the case of ferrofluid, making the host fluid of the same density as the ferrofluid. Another restrictive force is the tendency of the ferrofluid to adhere to the surfaces of a containing vessel such as parallel glass plates. A bilayer, equidensity, three-immiscible liquid combination is useful for horizontally oriented displays to provide an interface between two host fluids along which the ferrofluid can propagate, providing low friction bearing layers for ferrofluid bubbles.

One suitable three-fluid mixture is comprised of a water-base ferrofluid in a mixture of a fluorocarbon FREON* TF (trichlorotrifluoroethane) with a density of
97.69 lbs/ft/3/ at 77 degrees F, and kerosene, which are miscible, and higher density, higher molecular weight colorless, perfluorinated fluids such as FC-40 or FC-75** with boiling points of 320 degrees F and 316 degrees F, respectively, and a density at 77 degrees F of 117 lbs/ft/3/ and 110 lbs/ft/3/, respect...