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Interactive Typing Mode for Buffered Keyboard/ Printers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083362D
Original Publication Date: 1975-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Beechler, RL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Basic to the goal of higher speed keyboard/terminal operation is the utilization of buffered high-speed printing techniques. However, the use of such techniques can have considerable impact on typist keying performance. The principal reason for performance decrements is that buffered printers provide an asynchronous delay in print sound feedback to the typist while keying, instead of the synchronous delay characteristic of typewriter-like keyboard/printer terminals.

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Interactive Typing Mode for Buffered Keyboard/ Printers

Basic to the goal of higher speed keyboard/terminal operation is the utilization of buffered high-speed printing techniques. However, the use of such techniques can have considerable impact on typist keying performance. The principal reason for performance decrements is that buffered printers provide an asynchronous delay in print sound feedback to the typist while keying, instead of the synchronous delay characteristic of typewriter-like keyboard/printer terminals.

To overcome the deleterious effects of asynchronous print sound feedback on typist performance and still maintain typist usability needs, it is proposed that
(1) printing of a line or a partial line of keyed input be inhibited until the typist either presses the carriage return key or stops keying for a short period of time (for example, around 500 ms), and (2) that an auditory synchronous feedback signal (such as a click) occur for each typist keystroke--approximately 10-15 ms after the key has been depressed to the make point.

When one or the other of the two conditions are met, the system will signal the printer to print the information the typist has keyed into the buffer up to that point in time, whether it be a whole line or part of a line of keyed input. In the event the typist pauses more than once within a line, the system will print only that input keyed since the previous printing cycle.

The basic features of this concept are as follow...