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Column Layout Control for an Electronically Controlled Typewriter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083397D
Original Publication Date: 1975-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-01
Document File: 4 page(s) / 91K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Clancy, DE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A typewriter 2 is described having electronic controls which allows the typist, by manipulation of the keyboard keys, to position tab stops in relation to the material being keyed to layout columnar material, such that the white space or unfilled space between columns of typed material is substantially equal. This is accomplished by the electronic controls of the typewriter dividing the unused space and inserting a portion of that space between each column in a typing line.

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Column Layout Control for an Electronically Controlled Typewriter

A typewriter 2 is described having electronic controls which allows the typist, by manipulation of the keyboard keys, to position tab stops in relation to the material being keyed to layout columnar material, such that the white space or unfilled space between columns of typed material is substantially equal. This is accomplished by the electronic controls of the typewriter dividing the unused space and inserting a portion of that space between each column in a typing line.

Upon the completion of the keying operation, the machine is commanded to set the tab stops which it accomplishes by dividing the unused space into the necessary number of columnar spacing areas and shifting the tab set locations to the appropriate positions, and then resetting temporary tab stops to represent the column positions in their new locations.

The operation of the typewriter to cause layout of columnar material is accomplished as follows. A coded letter or alternate letter is entered into the electronic logic of the typewriter by the depression of the code key 15, and a subsequent depression of a key 8 on the keyboard or mode-control means. A coded letter may be referred to as an alternate letter and that indicates that the code button 15 on the keyboard has been depressed, to alter the state of one of the bits in the data byte being transmitted to the logic random-access memory 80 through the dynamic random-access memory 24. It has been altered to indicate a non-character or rather a function control input.

An alternate "L", by way of example only, is entered into the electronic logic to initiate the column layout sequence. The alternate is initiated by the operator, by the depression of the code or alternate button 15 and the alphabetic key 8 lever with the L associated therewith. This information is entered into the dynamic random-access memory 24 and is decoded and processed by the custom logic block 82, Fig. 3, after having been gated to it by the dynamic random-access memory block 24.

Upon the logic chip 80 detecting the depression of the code key 15 in addition to the binary code representing the letter L, the read-only store (ROS) select signal is sent to the ROS 10a together with the logically derived addresses. This action initiates a sequence of steps and reads stored commands from the ROS 100 back through the external data bus lines DX1- DX8, to the custom logic portion 82 of the logic random-access memory chip 80 illustrated in Fig. 2.

At this point, the typewriter 2 is conditioned by the outputs of the custom logic block 82 through the DATA-IN random-access memory line 88, the write random- access memory line 89, and the address lines 90 to store in address 30 and address 31 registers of the random-access memory array 84 and the duplicate address 30 and 31 registers, codes which cause the printer to select over lines 6 and 7 the forward magnet, the no-print magnet, and the...