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Speech Translation Machine for the Deaf

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083404D
Original Publication Date: 1975-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-01
Document File: 3 page(s) / 85K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fox, RG: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A standard stenotype machine may be adapted to translate and display speech in an easily read and understood phonetic word form. The machine is adapted to eliminate spaces between phonetic characters forming a word. Reformatting of the words permits them to appear in serial fashion on a line in justified position.

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Speech Translation Machine for the Deaf

A standard stenotype machine may be adapted to translate and display speech in an easily read and understood phonetic word form. The machine is adapted to eliminate spaces between phonetic characters forming a word. Reformatting of the words permits them to appear in serial fashion on a line in justified position.

Fig. 1 shows a standard stenotype machine 10 including a keyboard 12 and hard copy printout 14. Phonetic words are printed out on separate lines of the copy 14. Key(s), when depressed, place a character in a specific column on a line which can introduce spaces between letters of a phonetic word.

A key element 16 designated "FM - FORMAT" is included in the keyboard to juxtapose adjacent characters in a word for improved readability. Reformatting of the phonetic words from a vertical to a horizontal alignment, as shown in Fig. 2 by the display 18, is accomplished by the logic circuit 21 shown in Fig. 3.

Phonetic words formed by an operator are parallel loaded into a shift register 20, previously loaded with binary 0's. Key elements depressed by the operator replace binary 0's with binary 1's. Upon release of the key elements forming a phonetic word, a control element 22 sequentially shifts the register 20 to a random-access storage (RAS) write control and address counter 24.

The format key 16, when operated, enters a 0 in the register 20 in lieu of a binary 1. The presence of the binary 1 provides a code from a counter 26 which initiates a space entry between characters. The presence of a binary 0 eliminates the generation of the space code, which permits adjacent characters to be placed in juxtaposition.

When a numeric character is intended, an input is provided to the counter 26 which makes the appropriate adjustment in the c...