Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Hybrid Process for Thin Film Heads

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083488D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Smith, SH: AUTHOR

Abstract

Thin-film magnetic recording heads are manufactured without experiencing diffusion and crystallization problems caused by high temperatures. The most desirable process for manufacturing heads has been to vacuum deposit successive layers of a magnetic material (such as permalloy), a conductor (such as copper), and a second magnetic layer on a substrate with appropriate levels of insulating materials, not shown. Vacuum deposition requires temperatures around 360 degrees C, which tend to recrystallize copper. This reduces the electrical performance of the completed head and makes the crystallized copper susceptible to attack during etching operations, physically damaging the head. Other conductors, such as aluminum, are not satisfactory because they tend to diffuse into the first magnetic layer by electron migration.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 97% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Hybrid Process for Thin Film Heads

Thin-film magnetic recording heads are manufactured without experiencing diffusion and crystallization problems caused by high temperatures. The most desirable process for manufacturing heads has been to vacuum deposit successive layers of a magnetic material (such as permalloy), a conductor (such as copper), and a second magnetic layer on a substrate with appropriate levels of insulating materials, not shown. Vacuum deposition requires temperatures around 360 degrees C, which tend to recrystallize copper. This reduces the electrical performance of the completed head and makes the crystallized copper susceptible to attack during etching operations, physically damaging the head. Other conductors, such as aluminum, are not satisfactory because they tend to diffuse into the first magnetic layer by electron migration. Back gaps are improperly formed by deposition also, unless the head is held at an angle during the operation. This, however, undesirably affects the electrical characteristics of the head -- particularly the switching time.

A straightforward low temperature process avoiding these problems is: 1) Vacuum deposition of the first layer of permalloy on an insulated substrate, 2) Vacuum deposition of copper, 3) Electroplating of a second layer of permalloy. Metallization layers are provided before steps 1 and 2. After appropriate finishing steps, the head is cut along the cut line to expose its surface.

1

Page 2 of 2

2

[This...