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Browse Prior Art Database

Character Generator for Display

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083524D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gaulin, R: AUTHOR

Abstract

This description relates to a character for display in a unit such as a cathode-ray tube (CRT) or a matrix printer, where the characters are normally displayed in a rectangular dot matrix.

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At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
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Character Generator for Display

This description relates to a character for display in a unit such as a cathode- ray tube (CRT) or a matrix printer, where the characters are normally displayed in a rectangular dot matrix.

Conventional character generators are usually designed to display a character set (48, 64, 96, 128 characters) by a matrix of dots (5 x 7, 7 x 9, wide x high). This technique normally requires some form of memory, which will associate each of the characters in the character set to a corresponding pattern of dots in the matrix. The size of this memory is the number of bits or dots of the matrix times the number of characters in the character set, for example, a 64-bit character set on a 5 x 7 matrix requires 2,240 bits of memory.

The purpose of the present technique is to put character or symbol information in a convenient compressed notation by dividing the matrix up into a number of line segments, each segment comprising a number of adjacent dots, and then representing the characters or symbols by groups of line segments.

It has been found, for instance, that a 5 x 7 matrix may be divided into 16 line segments (as indicated in the figure), which may be grouped together to form 300 recognizably different characters. Therefore, all the standard alphanumeric and punctuation characters as well as many others may be generated with a 16- bit word, as opposed to a 35-bit word (that which would be required by conventional techniques for a 5 x 7 matrix)...